What do Catherine the Great and Dr. Seuss have in common?

I have never been a great fan of Dr. Seuss. But, something happened that may have changed that. Last week our son asked me to babysit two of their three grandchildren (no longer babies, ages 10 and 12). He was in Ottawa and his partner had gone to brush up on her ice hockey skills. The two grandchildren and I went to see their brother and his cousin play hockey. (The the cousins team came from being down 3-0 to tie the score). Then we waited for Montreals slowest-uniform-changing brother to emerge from the dressing room before returning home.   

 As soon as we arrived, the youngest, Ollie, ran upstairs and returned with a copy of Dr. Seusss book, The Lorax. She asked me to read it aloud. I don’t think I had ever read it previously. As I recall, conquering Hop on Pop was challenging enough when I read it to our children about 40 years ago. Nevertheless, I proceeded with the intriguing Lorax, with Ollie and her brother Oscar – the oldest of this familys children listening intently. They were spellbound, as was I. For them, it was undoubtedly my use of three voices for each of the main characters. For me, it was the realization that this was actually a conservationist tract written long before most of us were aware of threats to the planet. 

                      lorax ownload                          dr seuss Unknown

The Lorax                                             [Dr] Theodor Seuss Geisel

 Wikipedia tells us that this book was published in 1971. In it, Dr. Seuss chronicles the plight of the environment. The Lorax is the titular character who “speaks for the trees” and confronts the Once-ler who causes environmental destruction. The story is a fable concerning the danger of human destruction of the natural environment. Through personification Seuss creates characters for industry – the Once-ler, the environment – the Truffula trees, and for activism – the Lorax. He writes, “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to be get better. It’s not.” Seuss’s created a story addressing ndustrial/economic and environmental issues without it being dull. He stated, “The Lorax came out of me being angry I was out to attack what I think are evil things and let the chips fall where they might.” Suess must have succeeded in making his point because this book was banned by some libraries on the grounds that it portrayed the foresting industry negatively and might even persuade children to be against logging. 

When I finished the book I began to wonder if Seuss was a pioneering environmentalist. I doubt if many were concerned about global warming in 1971 although I trust there were some who worried about the forests and the oceans. 

Catherine_II_by_J.B.Lampi_(1780s,_Kunsthistorisches_Museum)

Catherine the Great

Then I remembered a friend telling me about Catherine the Great after she dumped Peter and took up with Grigory Potemkin (after whom the battleship was named). The Encyclopedia Britannica states that in 1774 Potemkin had distinguished himself in a war against Turkey and became Catherines lover. He was intelligent, ambitious and as audacious as Catherine was methodical.He was the only one of Catherine,s long line of favourites to play an extensive political role.

According to my friend, Potemkin took Catherine on a military tour of the Crimea. There were military fireworks (the real kind) for her pleasure every night, and fine dining. When they were out riding on nearby lands Catherine wanted to know why a huge deforested region was not cultivated. She was told it was infertile. She told a soldier to get a shovel and to dig down two shovel depths. She examined the soil and proclaimed that she knew how to make this soil productive. She then arranged to bring in approximately 36,000 ethnic Germans from the Mosel and Rhine Valleys, (among whom were my friend’s fore-bearers), along with a similar number of Gypsies, Mennonites, Bulgars, Rumanians, Macedonians, and Jews all from nearby countries. The result is the Russian breadbasket. Later, all those imported for this job were expelled and 4 or 5 generations later Russia took over the land.

Although making the land grow wheat may not qualify Catherine as a conservationist, at least the steps she took to rescue the barren fields helped counter the destruction caused by removing thousands upon thousands of trees, just as Seuss feared was happening.  

The lessson: As well as the strange coincidence I relate I want to use this opportunity to encourage readers to follow my excellent example and read to their children and grandchildren as often as they can. When our children were young, we – my wife and I – learned to choose books we would enjoy. Making these choices heightened the pleasure for all, even if our choices were often above the grade level of our audience. But, dont underestimate the comprehension of a child who is being read to – especially if you can add voices for all the main characters that were as enchanting as my voices  were.

 

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